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Educational Computing in the Electronic Age
Dr. Jerry P. Galloway
Activity Sheet
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Internet & the Web
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Return to Internet Ch. 9
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Return to Activity Contents
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All web page products created below must be successfully functional with no "broken"-graphics or deadend hyperlinks.
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I. Lab Activity------II. WP Web Report-----III. Resources Page- --IV. Web Quest---V. Professional Support Site----


Some activities below direct you to find and download graphic images.  Beware of copyright restrictions.  For purposes of these activities, you have permission to use the photos and imagery found on the various web pages of Dr. Jerry P. Galloway - BUT NOT those already located on disk or on this textbook CD:
  Start Here:  http://www.jerrygalloway.com/
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I. In-class "Lab" activity with HTML code

You are NOT PERMITTED to use any composer tool or HTML generator (like saving a Word file as a web page) for any part of this activity.

First: You are to find on the Internet and download to your disk 3 graphic images (line-art graphics or photos).  Selecting small images will make this assignment go much quicker.  The size of the photo is irrelevant.  Save these images to your disk as individual files.

Level-1: Use a simple text editor - such as Notepad (Windows) or SimpleText (Macintosh) - and create a web page by writing the HTML code manually.  Your page should display the three graphic images downloaded from the internet.  That's it.  Quality colors and screen layout can improve the evaluation of this project.

Level-2: Same is level-1 above, but include a URL address displayed in text beneath each of the displayed graphic images.  The URL address should also be hyperlinked back to that source.  Quality screen appearances, including the use of a table(s) to control layout can improve the evaluation of this project.

Level-3: Same as level-2 above, but upload the 3 graphic images and the completed HTML file to an on-line web site.  Submit to your instructor the new URL of this new on-line web page.

Note: Ask your instructor whether this is an "open-book" activity where you may seek information resources, examples and answers by searching on the open Internet (still- no composer tools).-or- whether this is considered a closed "memory-based" activity to be done from knowledge in your head.
 



 
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II.  Word-Processed Report

Search the Internet for a minimum of 5 sites that relate to and support your primary curriculum area.  The role of these sites, whether instructional, resources, information, commercial or games, etc., is up to you.

Using Microsoft Word, create a document that reports the URL address of each of the sites and write a brief anecdotal summary description of the site (several sentences on what it is and what it offers).  On your word document, the URL addresses should each be hyperlinked back to that site.

Also, download from any Internet site, a "legal" graphic images (art, photos, charts, etc.) that relate to and support your topic.  Save these images to your disk as individual files.  You should select one image to match each of the URL address found above but graphics can come from any source.

On your Ms.Word report, insert the graphic images onto the page with the anecdotal descriptions of the sites.  Size the graphic imagery to be complimentary to the summary descriptions and arrange them so text flows around or past them.  Again:  one image for each site described.

Title your Word paper for the curriculum area you are targeting. For example:  "Web Resources for Early Childhood Astronomy"

A sample startup Ms.Word file "blank" is provided called:    WEBREPRT.DOC  ...  access by clicking:  HERE.
 


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III. Resources Page

The intent of this project is to build your own web page that will then provide useful and important sites of interest linked for the reader (your students) in a curriculum content area of your choice.  A quality screen layout and appearance is expected.  Whether that includes tables, graphics, colors, etc., as may be appropriate or useful, will all be considered in the evaluation of the page.

Level-1:  Create a web page to contain hyperlinks to various sites of interest that relate to a curriculum subject area of your choice.  Because this is a relatively open-ended project allowing a lot of creativity on your part, some structure or restrictions cannot be reasonably anticipated here.  However, you should have each of the categories below and try to find at least 3 sites for each of the following.

  1. Facts and Information
  2. Activities - Things to do.
  3. Other Web Resources
And you can also include a 4th section called: ... to include whatever you want.

The three primary categories should contain site links consistent with that group.  As your selected sites are listed within each of the sections, they should each be hyperlinked to that source.  Obviously, some sort of meaningful descriptor for each link would be helpful to determine whether it might be of interest.

Be sure to title the page appropriately and display your name.  Be sure to remember the intent of the activity is to design a page that would be useful as resources for YOUR students who might studying this topic area.
 

Level-2:  Upload the page(s) created in level-1 to an actual on-line site.  Be sure the on-line version is completely functional as intended and submit the URL to your instructor.
 


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IV. Web Quest

Web Quests are typically assumed to have a particular structure with particular sections or categories of material.  While some degree of variance or unique layout is allowed and may be quite appropriate, the spirit behind such common "web quest" structures should be followed.  The intent of this project is to build a web site that directs YOUR students through a coordinated program of study on a relatively narrow and focused subject.

A typical design is as follows:
 

Introduction Background and setting the stage for the inquiry learning activity.
Task What is the inquiry?  Perhaps a question to be answered, something to be discovered or an understanding to be achieved.
Process: Tells your students how to manage time, use tools, find and utilize resources, sequence their activities or anything else that may be necessary.  What is the expected time-line of this web quest... one class, two weeks, etc.  Any group activities allowed?
Resources: This is typically a series of preselected web sites that relate to and support the inquiry learning activity.  While hyperlinks are typically provided here, students can also be directed to other sources of information beyond the Internet.
Evaluation: Your students may be directed to produce a written or oral report or even a multimedia presentation or web-based report as the final product of this endeavor.
Reflections: Include an arrangement for your students to reflect on their work, their product, as well as the nature of the web quest experience.  Pose questions like: What was the most helpful resource?  What did you think was most interesting?  What unexpected surprises did you discover?  - Plan a method for submitting these reflections. 

It is probably best - although not absolutely necessary - that your Web Quest be arranged onto several web pages to better present the various aspects of the activity.

Of course, it is expected that the page(s) be well designed with appropriate use of color, layout, graphics, etc., so as to produce a highly-professional, motivating and user-friendly site.

Level-1:  Prepare the site on disk with all related files and your web pages so as to be functional "on disk."  Of course, the Internet resources will still require on-line access as your disk will only contain YOUR files.

Level-2:  Upload the page(s) and all files created in level-1 to an actual on-line site.  Be sure the on-line version is completely functional as intended and submit the URL to your instructor.
 


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V. Professional Support Site

The intent of this project is to build your own "HOME" page that would realistically support your role as an educator.  It is understandable if many features are planned and designed on a hypothetical basis as you may not yet be a classroom teacher.

While this is the most sophisticated web design project compared to the others listed above, it is also the most open-ended.  You are free to be as creative as you like but be sure to consider the overall intent of the site.  You should consider including some of the following elements plus any additional components that you thing are important.

  1. Teaching Philosophy
  2. Contact Information
  3. Content Area Focus
  4. Activities or Assignments
  5. Support materials for assigned activities
  6. Hyperlinks to relevant external Internet resources
  7. Professional Development Area (associations, organizations, etc.)
  8. Photo Gallery
  9. Schedule or Calendar
Be sure to consider all levels of the community finding your site useful.  That includes not just your classroom students, but also... For example, if you are a history teacher and specialize in 19th century U.S. history, don't make your site only about the Civil War.  On the other hand, strive to make your site THE site that all educators of similar interests would want to use for their classes.

That is, one level of usefulness is local:  your classes, your students, their parents - period.  A higher level of usefulness might be regional or national:  it's a web site,... why not reach out to the whole world in your subject area.  This larger universe for your web site does ultimately return benefits to you classroom and your students.

There would of course be thematic decoration, color and a highly-professional user-friendly screen layout and function.

There is technically no end to such a site, no definitive completion or termination of its development.  It can continually be developed and expanded.  So, you might want to illustrate the "inclusion" of various areas or interests by creating the page but simply labeling it as "Under Construction" or "Available Soon."  Check with your instructor as to how much must be completely developed versus merely establishing placeholders for future development.

Level-1:  Prepare the site on disk with all related files and your web pages so as to be functional "on disk."  Of course, the Internet resources will still require on-line access as your disk will only contain YOUR files.

Level-2:  Upload the page(s) and all files created in level-1 to an actual on-line site.  Be sure the on-line version is completely functional as intended and submit the URL to your instructor.
 


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Contact through author
Dr. Jerry P. Galloway
iun@jerrygalloway.com